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Criteria for Scripts

No

Criteria

Assesment

1

Story (Big) Idea*

Excellent

Good

Fair

Low

Null

2

Basic Story*

Excellent

Good

Fair

Low

Null

3

Character Explanation

Presented

Null

4

Location Explanations

Presented

Null

5

Plot*

Excellent

Good

Fair

Low

Null

6

Outline/Storyline

Presented

Null

7

Storyboard

Excellent

Good

Fair

Low

Null

8

Dialog*

Excellent

Good

Fair

Low

Null

*) Compulsory

Excellent = 5

Good = 4

Fair = 3

Low = 2

Nothing = 1

Presented = 3

Null = 1

An assesment of less than 20 does not pass the script criteria

In the following, we will explain seven different criteria and give examples of each below in the blue text. The expectation of CVC Video Script from you is the brief explanation of what your video will contain, similar to the blue text.

(Note: Some scripts will be less detailed than the following and some will give more details. This depends on the topic and the Producer. The following is an example of a video produced with several character roles. We are requiring a script because this will help you be more successful in producing a good 3 minute video.)

1. STORY IDEA

Story idea is one sentence which explains the point of the story. We also call this “The Big Idea.” We will always provide you with “The Big Idea.”

The subject which is written in the beginning of the story, is usually a human being. It can also be about non-humans, such as animals, sun, water, time or something else. This may be difficult since non-human subjects cannot act, and rarely have interesting problems.

STORY IDEA – e.g . : A father who gives his live to save his son.

2. BASIC STORY

The story idea of only a sentence must be developed into the basic story, which the content is not more than one page. The basic story is usually about only half a page. The content of that basic story has information of time and place, explanations from the characters who appear in the story, the main conflicts, and solution . Don’t be bashful to write the end of the story, do not keep it to yourself or take everyone by surprise. You can’t surprise people in the process of a scenario script.

BASIC STORY – e.g .:

In the middle of town, there is a small family consisting of the father and his three sons. In the morning, the father teaches the message of God to them. Yet Joshua (the oldest son), seems gloomy and barely joins in the service with his family. In the afternoon, Joshua leaves the house while still feeling gloomy. His friends ask him to join them, and he gets drunk with his friends.

His friends then introduce him to the street gang on that street. The street gang gives Joshua some money without any clear purpose. Joshua is not a rich kid, so when he is given some money, he feels extremely happy and wastes it with his friends. He spends the money paying for prostitutes, smoking, drugs, and gambling.

When he is on the way home, he meets the gang members who just gave him the money. They ask for his money. Joshua is afraid, and asks for their mercy because he cannot return it. Then the gang members get angry and punch him; and at the same time, Joshua’s father sees and comes to help Joshua.

When he discovers that Joshua was beaten by the gang members, he tells Joshua to immediately leave the area. Then the gang members proceed to beat Joshua’s father until he is near death. They then run away because they are afraid that the police will arrest them. After they are gone, Joshua returns to his dying father. He picks up his father and tries to bring him home. Unfortunately, his father is very weak; this makes Joshua cry, and he regrets his behavior very much.

3. CHARACTER

In this scenario that we’re going to create, there will be several characters. We must make them completely recognizable. We need to know how the characters dialogue, think and act. We need to know how they solve problems, as well as any conflicts among the characters themselves.

In casting characters, the explanation of each one is important in finding a suitable actor to play the role. To develop the other non-main characters, we can ask for their personal data, such as full name and nickname, religion, age, the relationship between family and friends, interests (science, movies, music, sport, books, food), physical features, intelligence, fashion style, mannerisms, etc.

CHARACTER IN DETAIL – e.g .: Joshua, a high school student, 18 years old, average education. Friendly, modest, and thin. He is good at socialising. His hobby is hanging out with his friends. Easily influenced. He lives in a simple house and is poor. He has only a father who loves God and the holy bible. He also has two brothers. His mother passed away three years ago.

4. LOCATION

To make a scene, we need to establish the setting and location beforehand. It will make it easier for us to determine the scene. Some questions that need to be answered are: what are you doing, where is the position, where have you been, where are you heading to, what do you?

The scene can be on a set built in a studio, such as a room in a house: porch, living room or kitchen. A set may also be a street or any number of other places.

The set explanation below is useful as a guide for the set builder.

LOCATION – e.g . : Joshua’s house: A very simple, narrow house; walls have not been repainted for some time. The house is somewhat dark and has no windows.

5. PLOT

The plot arrangement is required in writing a video clip scenario just as much as it is for a novel or short story. Its structure usually consists of three scenes: set up or rising action, confrontation or problem complication, and resolution. By arranging the plot earlier, it will help the writer complete the scenario.

PLOT – e.g .:

Scene I: In the morning, the father reads the Bible with his kids. But Joshua does not listen to his father and ignores the message. He leaves the house with a gloomy face.

Scene II: Joshua is still in a somber mood. He meets his friends who affect his behavior negatively. He is addicted to liquor, cigarettes, drugs, and gambling. Until he spends all of his money in the end.

Scene III: He is deceived by the street gang, who ask him to return their money. He is almost beaten by them until his father comes to his aid. Finally, his father is beaten. Joshua deeply regrets this, and the consequences are that his father is badly injured and faints.

6. OUTLINE

The outline is a list comprising of each scene in detail. The outline can also be thought of as an outline of the plot. Here is an example:

OUTLINE – e.g .:

1. Joshua’s house :

1.1. A father reads the Bible with a soft voice,

1.2. His brothers listen to it with great pleasure,

1.3. Joshua feels gloomy and does not want to listen to his father,

1.4 His father is still patient towards his sons,

1.5. Joshua ignores his father and leaves the house, etc.

7. STORYBOARD

A storyboard consists of the Scene, Action and Dialogue. It also typically has a visual layout, time duration and dialogue. The storyboard is typically in table format like below.

STORYBOARD – e.g .:

No.

Scene

Visual Captured

Duration

Action

Dialogue

1.

INT. Joshua’s house – in the morning

(placed picture of camera, talent position, direction captured, lightning, etc.)

00:00:25

A father teaches the Bible to his three sons.

Father (voice-over)

Now, the Scriptures say “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

2.

EXT. Street in front of Joshua’s house – in the afternoon

STA*

00:00:07

Joshua walks out, his face full of gloom

*) Same as The Above

8. SCENE

Scene or scene heading is the information regarding the scene. Generally, scene heading consists of scene number, INT/EXT, scene location, and time duration scene. INT stands for interior, is used when the picture captured is conducted inside the room. EXT stand for exterior, is used when the picture captured is conducted outside the room.

SCENE – e.g .:

1. INT. JOSHUA’S HOUSE – IN THE MORNING

9. ACTION

Action is information describing the event(s) in each scene.

ACTION – e.g .:

INT. JOSHUA’S HOUSE – IN THE MORNING

A father teaches the Bible to his three sons.

10. DIALOGUE & PARENTHETICAL

Dialogue are the lines that are spoken by the characters in the scene. In contrast, parenthetical is the emotions and expressions that are to be conveyed by the character(s). For example: emotional, sad, cry, smile, laugh, etc. There is also a type of dialogue which follows a scene path which is the inner voice or thoughts of the character(s); it is called Voice Over (V.O.).

DIALOGUE & PARENTHETICAL – e.g .:

1. INT. JOSHUA’S HOUSE – IN THE MORNING

Joshua’s father is excited to read the Bible to his three sons. With his wisdom, he gives advice to them in facing life’s difficulties. His youngest son smiles and nods his head. Except Joshua, who looks gloomy and is not grateful for what he has now.

Father (V.O.)

The Bible says “because the future is here, and hope never gone.” So, even though we have such a difficult life and are poor, we must hold on to God’s word that the future is even possible. We must be hopeful that our life can be transformed.

STANDARD REQUIREMENT For Scripts

In writing scripts, there are some standard requirements, as follows:

  1. Font Courier New
  2. Size 12
  3. Single spacing

The three formats above directly relate to movie duration. It’s generally accepted that with the font Courier New, size 12, and single spacing, one scenario page is equal to about one minute of movie duration. For a typical two hour movie, an average script would be about 120 pages.

Click here to download “The Criteria for Script in English language” document

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